Update: Deposit $50 Get $100 Bonus + $25 FREE Instant Bonus
Thats $125 FREE Bonus! Enter Titan Poker Bonus Code: TP2000

Ultimate Gaming Adds a New Executive

As Ultimate Poker heads towards their release of Version 2.0 the parent company (Ultimate Gaming) of the only licensed real-money online poker site in the United States has added a new executive, naming Mike Britt Vice President of Market Development and Government Affairs.

Britt isn’t some online gaming insider. In fact his resume has not a whisper of online gaming experience, but he has worked for The Wynn in a similar role to his job with Ultimate Poker. Britt started his career on Wall Street before moving on to politics where he worked as a campaign manager, and he now seems to be using his political experience to help gaming companies.

After launching on April 30, 2013 Ultimate Poker has been the only company allowed by the Nevada Gaming Commission to launch their real-money online poker site. With a three month head-start Ultimate Poker has built up a solid but not astounding player base, with average traffic at the site of about 200 cash-game players and a similar number of tournament players according to pokerscout.com.

Ultimate Poker has also done a bit of marketing by signing a couple handfuls of poker players to represent the site. The first Ultimate Poker Ambassador was Antonio Esfandiari, and during the WSOP the site added Jason Somerville, Randy Dorfman, Jonathan Little, Lauren Kling, Gavin Griffin, Dan O’Brien, Phil Collins, and William Reynolds.

Here is a look at the Press Release announcing the hiring of Britt:

LAS VEGAS (July 25, 2013) – Government affairs and gaming professional Mike Britt has joined Ultimate Gaming, America’s first regulated online gaming operator, as vice president of market development and government affairs. He brings 10 years of experience in politics, legislative affairs and market development to the company.

MIKE BRITT JOINS ULTIMATE GAMING AS VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKET DEVELOPMENT AND GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

In his new role, Britt will be responsible for new market development and legislative efforts to pave the way for operations in real money online gaming jurisdictions. He will help drive the specific strategies and execution plans for online gaming expansion within the United States and other global jurisdictions. Britt will work to effectively position Ultimate Gaming with proper legislation in new markets, which includes crafting legislation and reviewing gaming regulations.

Britt started his career on Wall Street but quickly made his way into the world of politics. He has worked on many successful campaigns across the United States, including spending a year as an associate director at the White House Office of Political Affairs during the George W. Bush administration. Before joining Ultimate Gaming, Britt served as vice president of community and government affairs for Wynn Resorts.

Ultimate Gaming made history on April 30, 2013, when it launched real money online poker at UltimatePoker.com, becoming the first company in the United States to offer legal and secure online poker. On July 11, Ultimate Gaming successfully completed the field trial for Ultimate Poker, receiving recommendation for approval from the Nevada Gaming Control Board.

Ultimate Poker offers an exhilarating and secure online poker experience to anyone age 21 and over located in the state of Nevada. Players in Nevada can play now at UltimatePoker.com, while any player in the world can sign up and deposit in advance of visiting Nevada.

About Ultimate Gaming/Ultimate Poker:

Ultimate Gaming represents a new breed of online gaming company backed by regulation and driven to create authentic entertainment experiences across online gaming platforms. The company is headquartered in Las Vegas, Nevada, the gaming and regulatory capital of the world, and was founded by four of the most prominent entrepreneurs in the city’s recent gaming and technology history. In 2011, Ultimate Gaming acquired CyberArts, allowing the company to create and maintain its own proprietary casino software complete with a clean regulatory slate.

Ultimate Poker is a licensed online poker room in the state of Nevada, leading the way through extraordinary service, best-in-class rewards, and a true-to-its-roots poker experience. Created by online poker specialists and backed by Las Vegas gaming leaders, Ultimate Poker brings fun back to the online felt by merging entertainment, competition, and the gaming lifestyle. Ultimate Poker is the exclusive online gaming partner of the Ultimate Fighting Championship® (UFC®), the fastest growing sports organization in the world, and is the online poker product of Station Casinos, the preferred gaming destination for Las Vegas locals.

Join the conversation on Facebook: facebook.com/UltimatePoker

Follow the action on Twitter: twitter.com/UltimatePoker

Watch us on YouTube: youtube.com/UltimatePoker

Access our media kit for more information: PR@UltimateGaming.com

Want to know more about Titan Poker? Check out our extensive review on this poke room. Click here.

Ultimate Poker Three Months Later

Nearly three months after the launch of Ultimate Poker in Nevada (yes it’s been three months already) the site remains the only regulated real-money online poker site in the state, and for that matter in the US. While traffic numbers haven’t been anything to write home about, the site has managed to just about double the average number of players since their first week. So what are the other licensed operators in Nevada waiting for –other than the ok by the Nevada Gaming Commission? Many of the licensed operators have partnership deals with companies that run existing online poker rooms, so why have they been unable to get their product out there and compete with Ultimate Poker?

I understand wanting to have all of your ducks in a row, but there is also something to be said for not giving your competitors a three to six month head start where they are operating as a virtual monopoly. But the follow-up question falls squarely on Ultimate Poker, and whether or not they have been able to capitalize on their three-month head start?

When Ultimate Poker first launched the site had an average of about 100 players over its first week according to pokerscout.com. That number has now climbed to around 200 players, with Ultimate Poker seeing peak traffic numbers above 400 players during the WSOP, judging by the data on pokerscout.com. UP has had its shares of ups and downs since launch –preferring to be first-in and fixing problems as they arise, rather than waiting to have all of the glitches ironed out—and the site has been constantly running new promotions, tournaments, and is now on the verge of launching their VIP Loyalty Program, which will utilize an industry-first “Winner Take All” rake method. But they are probably still below expectations. If you told Ultimate Poker before they launched that they would have the market all to themselves for three months I would imagine they would have thought they would have more than 200 players on average.

So has Ultimate Poker taken advantage of their Nevada online poker monopoly? I would say the answer is both yes and no. When it comes to bringing in new players (customers) Ultimate Poker has not capitalized on their head start, but when it comes to building their brand I think the site has done a fairly good job considering they were starting from square one, with a new product and a new brand name.

Still, UP is operating behind the eight-ball because once a site like WSOP.com launches (with the Caesars, WSOP, and 888 brand behind it) will current UP customers stay with the site, or jump ship to the more familiar names in the industry? The smart money would be on players jumping ship. There has to be at least a significant portion of players currently on Ultimate Poker who are playing there because it’s the only game in town, so the site has to be concerned about what happens when WSOP.com or some other site launches.

 

Bodog and PokerScout Still Not on the Same Page

In December of 2011 we first brought you news about the longstanding feud between the online poker traffic tracking site PokerScout.com and the online poker room Bodog, where Bodog accused PokerScout of profiting from online poker sites’ data without permission. Of course, PokerScout sees this very differently, and as PokerScout.com owner Dan Stewart claims, the site’s “duty to our readers to provide neutral and complete coverage of the market necessarily took precedence over the wishes of a single operator.”

Over the years everything from extortion to “cooked numbers” have been levied, and it seems that the feud is still alive and well after PokerScout.com removed Bodog from their tracking numbers, which some thought was pokerscout.com finally capitulating to Bodog’s requests to remove them. However, the absence of Bodog lasted only 24 hours, and when the site returned to the traffic rankings CalvinAyre.com’s xxx penned another article criticizing PokerScout.com and their data collection methods.

Check out our latest online poker promotions here.

 

Are We Better Off with Intra-state Online Poker?

Considering the way the recent hearing on online poker in the Senate went it’s pretty safe to say that the probability of the federal government passing online poker legislation in the near future is iffy at best. So with that in mind I’ve decided to take a look at the other option, the state-by-state option, and look at the glass as half-full when it comes to intra-state online poker.

Spoiled would be a fitting word to sum up the current generation that got their start in poker during the post-Moneymaker boom years. Not spoiled in the sense that they got everything they wanted without any sacrifice, but spoiled in that they were in the right place at the right time to capitalize on the bountiful years that lasted from 2003 to about 2009.

These players never had to “find a game”, or play Seven Card Stud because Holdem didn’t run in the morning hours. They never entered a casino and saw just two half-full tables of $4/$8 Limit Holdem running, with a lot of gray-haired rocks occupying the seats. And with some exceptions they never participated in backroom poker games, or had to organize a game to make sure there were enough players. For the most part they were allowed to pick and choose when, where, and for how much they wanted to play.

Instead, players of the boom years had thousands of choices at their fingertips (literally) and could always find a game either at a casino or by simply firing up an online poker site. Players like myself, who went through the “lean years” also became spoiled during this time, expecting the worldwide player-pool to constantly stock the poker pond full of fish. But that started to change after UIGEA was passed in 2006, and by the time Black Friday hit the online poker world was already being Balkanized, with regions cutting themselves off from the rest of the world, as countries legalized and regulated online poker.

As much as I like the idea of thousands of tables to choose from I still find myself reminiscing about the old days. A time when there was more to being a good poker player than pinpointing three-bet ranges and poring over Holdem Manager stats. So in a way, I’m somewhat torn on whether I want national/international player pools, or if intra-state (with smaller states going inter-state) online poker might not bring back the “old days” in a sense.

It might be interesting to see online poker hotspots spring-up in California and Nevada, while states like Massachusetts would become known for Seven-Card-Stud games and low limit holdem. Some states would have softer games, with the stakes generally lower, while others would be more competitive, with high-stakes action; like it used to be live.

Nostalgia aside, the real question we have to ask ourselves is; how big of a player-pool do we need? We obviously want new and casual players to feel comfortable, and the appeal of online poker has always been the speed –you deposit, you sit, and you play all in the span of five minutes—and the availability of another game.

It would actually be interesting to me, since most of the real pros would move to states with the biggest games and the biggest player pools, which would mean up-and-coming players would probably overestimate their actual skill until they landed in one of these poker-pro-populated states. Imagine a young player crushing the online poker games in Massachusetts and deciding to move to LA to take on the big boys. It would create a whole new dynamic in the poker world, and it just might be good for the game.

For more online poker news check our Titan Poker News section.

Is Poker Gambling? For Most People the Answer Is…

…Yes.

There is an interesting argument that often accompanies talk of poker legislation, and that is whether or not poker is gambling. You actually might be surprised to find that I fall in the camp that calls poker gambling, considering I’ve played the game for over a decade and have never had a losing year at the poker tables. So what gives? How can I possibly say poker is gambling? Let me explain.

First and foremost, there is luck in the game; yes, in the long-run the luck will even out, but with such a high amount of short-term variance calling poker anything more than Advantage Gambling is simply wrong. But this isn’t even the main reason why I call poker gambling.

The reason I call poker gambling is actually quite simple; for the vast majority of players (I’ll put the number at somewhere between 90% and 95%) poker is a losing proposition; they will lose money in the long-run no matter how skillfully they play their cards. Now, I’m not talking about low-limit players, putting in 75-hour weeks and grinding out $25,000-$50,000 a year –since you could take a job stocking shelves at Home Depot and make the same amount of money if you put in 75-hour weeks; I’m talking about players in mid- to high-stakes games. These losses occur for three very simple reasons:

  • #1: Most people simply suck at poker and won’t take the time to learn the game. Sorry to break it to you, but if you play your heart, and you suck, you’re going to lose. For unskilled players poker is the worst game in the house; you’re actually better off playing roulette.
  • #2: Players rise to their level of competency. Everyone wants to be Phil Ivey, so everyone keeps climbing through the ranks until they hit a level they can’t beat. Once this happens, these players go through a vicious cycle of jumping up and down between games they can beat and games they can’t; in the end they usually go broke.
  • #3: The rake and expenses will kill you. This is truer now than it has ever been in the past too. We are now in age of poker where the skill gap has shrunk to all-time lows, and it’s getting smaller and smaller all the time. No matter how skillful players become they are always at the mercy of a bell curve. If you put 10 equally skilled players at a table they will be performing the monotonous task of passing money back and forth while the house slowly eats away their collective bankrolls through the rake.

So on one hand we have terrible players who will simply lose money time after time, and for these players poker offers worse odds than any of the mindless-house-edge-games you find in a casino. Then you have a second group of players who are skilled, but not skilled enough to surpass their peers and essentially pass money back-and-forth with one another while the rake eats away their bankroll. These players also act as a middle-man of sorts, winning money from the terrible players and holding on to it until a better player comes along and relieves them of their burden.

So you see, poker IS gambling. Learn more about online poker at Titan Poker Bonus!

 

PKR Poker Pro in Hot Water after Scamming Backers

One of the top young talents in the game is being called out for some incredibly shady behavior regarding his 2013 World Series of Poker stake. EPT Snowfest winner Vladimir “Beyne” Geshkenbein, a poker pro at PKR Poker, has admitted to blowing through his WSOP stake, some $84,000, and using the money plus subsequent winnings from earlier events at the WSOP to gamble and pay off prior debts according to a thread on 2+2.

Because of his behavior, Geshkenbein found himself felted prior to the Main Event (which was supposed to be included in the stake) and had to appeal to his backers for forgiveness and to absolve him of his agreement. Obviously they wanted to be made whole, so after working out a deal, that included him being staked by another person in the Main Event, he managed to make a deep run in the WSOP Main Event, but has not been heard from since, leaving his original backers out in the cold.

The situation is at times hard to follow, as you’ll have to go though some foreign language poker forums and posts, but fortunately, one of the backers posting as “mo3rtelmu” on 2+2, summed up the situation thusly:

- vlad sold 84k sched on pstrategy for wsop incl main @1.6mu, general package was at v reasonable mus and considered a good deal

-wsop starts well w deepruns/cashes

-~3hs b4 mainevent day 1c, he comes in the thread and admits he degened our money away w cg/sng/paying personal depts

-says he needs to cancel our deal and other backer offers him a 1timedeal which he has to accept to recoup funds for us + otherwise he cant play main

-he goes deeper and deeper, stakers are raging and angry, skype group of victims is founded which produces the aquivalent of 200 doc pages in ~5days

- we reach VG and negotiate for a deal which gives us action in case of FT (his max offer was full package refund if he makes top 27)

-vlad agrees to the deal if all stakers agree and the public bashing stopped, some stakers disagree, vlad says we dont have a deal and he wont negotiate during ME (meaning his original "offer" of 840$/% incase of top 27 and 637$/% (main*mu) counts atm, vlad stops communicating

- he finishes in 62th place

What’s more puzzling is that nobody has brought up the possibility that Geshkenbein may have still had the Main Event stake money and attempted to cancel the backing deal citing a “new” backer as the reason he would then be able to play. Which would allow him to freeroll (actually more than freeroll as he charged a 1.6 markup for the Main Event) the tournament.

For me, the most interesting part of the story is the failure of PKR Poker to distance themselves from Geshkenbein. Instead the site has deleted a corresponding thread in their forum, and has taken no action against the young Russian pro that has basically been the face of the site for the past two years. Unlike other similar situations where accusations have been made, in this case Geshkenbein has admitted to screwing his backers, and it reflects poorly on PKR to pretend there is nothing going on.

As referenced in the 2+2 thread, this is not Beyne’s first brush with trouble in poker. In 2008 he admitted to cheating at the iPoker network in order to win their jackpot Sit & Go promotion (http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/54/poker-beats-brags-variance/beat-banned-life-217177/). Check out the list of the top online poker rooms today here.

PokerStars Unveils Preliminary Schedule for the 2013 WCOOP

On the same day that Full Tilt Poker offered up their schedule for the FTOPS XXIII series, their sister-site, PokerStars, released preliminary details on the 2013 World Championship of Online Poker (WCOOP) which will be a 65 event tournament series beginning on September 8, 2013 and running for three full weeks.

No guarantees were given except to say that the winner of the Main Event on September 29 will win at least $1.5 million, and as Rick Dacey stated on the PokerStars blog:

“Now, this schedule is not set in stone and the guys sat hammering away in the poker room boiler room are asking for feedback. You can send that to them direct by emailing wcoop@pokerstars.com.”

Unveiling a tentative schedule, and letting their players’ feedback decide where a tweak may need to be made, or what type of tournament should be added, has been PokerStars MO over the past couple of years, and the poker community has praised for the site for listening to and acting upon their suggestions.

Here is a glimpse at the preliminary 2013 WCOOP Schedule revealed by PokerStars on Monday:

Sunday 8 Sep
Event 01 – 11:00 ET: $215 NL Hold’em [6-Max] (2-Day Event)
Event 02 – Sun, 08 Sep, 14:30 ET: $215 NL Hold’em (2-Day Event)

Monday 9 September
Event 03 – 11:00 ET: $320 PL Omaha
Event 04 – 14:00 ET: $320 NL Hold’em [6-Max, Shootout, No Late Reg] Event 05 – 17:00 ET: $215 NL Hold’em [Rebuys, Turbo]

Tuesday 10 September
Event 06 – 11:00 ET: $215 NL Draw
Event 07 – 14:00 ET: $215 PL Courchevel Hi/Lo [Re-Entry] Event 08 – 17:00 ET: $1,050 NL Hold’em (Super Tuesday Replacement) (2-Day Event)

Wednesday 11 September
Event 09 – 06:00 ET: $215 PL Omaha (Knockout)
Event 10 – 11:00 ET: $320 NL Hold’em [Ante Up] (2-Day Event)
Event 11 – 14:00 ET: $215 NL Hold’em [Heads-Up, No Late Reg] (2-Day Event)

Thursday 12 September
Event 12 – 06:00 ET: $215 PL 5-Card Omaha H/L [6-Max, 2R1A] Event 13 – 11:00 ET: $530 NL Hold’em [6-Max, Knockout] (2-Day Event)
Event 14 – 14:00 ET: $215 7-Card Stud H/L

Friday 13 September
Event 15 – 11:00 ET: $215 PL Omaha [6-Max] Event 16 – 14:00 ET: $215 NL Single Draw 2-7
Event 17 – 17:00 ET: $320 NL Hold’em [Turbo, Zoom]

Saturday 14 September
Event 18 – 11:00 ET: $109 NL Hold’em
Event 19 – 13:00 ET: $320 NL Hold’em [Super-Knockout] Event 20 – 15:00 ET: $215 FL Hold’em

Sunday 15 September
Event 21 – 11:00 ET: $215 NL Hold’em (2-Day Event)
Event 22 – 12:30 ET: $25,500 NL Hold’em [High-Roller] (2-Day Event)
Event 23 – 14:30 ET: $700 NL Hold’em (2-Day Event)

Monday 16 September
Event 24 – 11:00 ET: $215 NL Hold’em [4-Max] Event 25 – 14:00 ET: $320 7-Card Stud
Event 26 – 17:00 ET: $215 PL Omaha [Turbo, 1R1A]

Tuesday 17 September
Event 27 – 11:00 ET: $320 Mixed Hold’em
Event 28 – 14:00 ET: $320 PL Badugi
Event 29 – 17:00 ET: $1,050 NL Hold’em (Super Tuesday Replacement) (2-Day Event)

Wednesday 18 September
Event 30 – 06:00 ET: $215 NL Hold’em [Progressive KO] Event 31 – 11:00 ET: $530 NL Hold’em [10-Max, Triple Shootout, No Late Reg] (2-Day Event)
Event 32 – 14:00 ET: $320 8-Game

Thursday 19 September
Event 33 – 06:00 ET: $320 NL Hold’em [6-Max] (2-Day Event)
Event 34 – 11:00 ET: $320 PL 5-Card Omaha [6-Max, 1R1A] Event 35 – 14:00 ET: $320 Triple Draw 2-7

Friday 20 September
Event 36 – 11:00 ET: $215 NL Hold’em (Rebuys)
Event 37 – 14:00 ET: $530 FL Omaha H/L
Event 38 – 17:00 ET: $215 PNL Hold’em

Saturday 21 September
Event 39 – 11:00 ET: $700 NL Hold’em [Heads-Up, No Late Reg] (2-Day Event)
Event 40 – 13:00 ET: $320 NL Hold’em [Super-Knockout] (2-Day Event)
Event 41 – 15:00 ET: $320 HORSE

Sunday 22 September
Event 42 – 11:00 ET: $215 NL Hold’em (2-Day Event)
Event 43 – 12:30 ET: $15,400 NL Hold’em [High-Roller Heads-Up, No Late Reg] Event 44 – 14:30 ET: $2,100 NL Hold’em (2-Day Event)

Monday 23 September
Event 45 – 11:00 ET: $320 PL Omaha [Rebuys, 6-Max] Event 46 – 14:00 ET: $320 NL Hold’em [Re-Entry] (2-Day Event)
Event 47 – 17:00 ET: $215 NL Hold’em [Turbo, Knockout]

Tuesday 24 September
Event 48 – 11:00 ET: $320 Mixed NL Hold’em/PL Omaha
Event 49 – 14:00 ET: $530 Razz
Event 50 – 17:00 ET: $1,050 NL Hold’em (Super Tuesday Replacement) (2-Day Event)

Wedmesday 25 September
Event 51 – 06:00 ET: $215 NL Hold’em (1R1A)
Event 52 – 11:00 ET: $215 NL Hold’em [Re-Entry, Big Antes] (2-Day Event)
Event 53 – 14:00 ET: $320 PL Omaha H/L

Thursday 26 September
Event 54 – 06:00 ET: $320 NL Hold’em
Event 55 – 11:00 ET: $530 NL Hold’em (Rebuys)
Event 56 – 14:00 ET: $2,100 PL Omaha [6-Max]

Friday 27 September
Event 57 – 11:00 ET: $530 NL Hold’em (1R1A)
Event 58 – 14:00 ET: $1,050 FL Hold’em [6-Max] Event 59 – 17:00 ET: $215 NL Omaha H/L

Saturday 28 September
Event 60 – 11:00 ET: $700 PL Omaha [Heads Up, No Late Reg] (2-Day Event)
Event 61 – 13:00 ET: $320 NL Hold’em [Super-Knockout] (2-Day Event)
Event 62 – 15:00 ET: $2,100 HORSE

Sunday 29 September
Event 63 – 11:00 ET: $215 NL Hold’em [8-Max] (2-Day Event)
Event 64 – 12:30 ET: $5,200 8-Game
Event 65 – 14:30 ET: $10,300 NL Hold’em Main Event [$1.5M Gtd to 1st] (2-Day Event)

Join Titan Poker's elite at our Club Titan VIP! Get exclusive promos than the regular member. Click the link to know more.

Full Tilt Poker Announces FTOPS XXIII Schedule

On August 4, 2013 the 23rd running of the popular FTOPS online tournament series will kick-off at Full Tilt Poker, with a $200+$15 NLHE reentry tournament with a $500,000 guarantee. Over the course of two weeks a total of 39 events will be held at Full Tilt Poker, as the site offers up $8 million in guaranteed prize-money for the FTOPS XXIII.

The highlight of the series will take place on Sunday August 18, 2013 when the $600+$35 Main Event will be held. The Main Event will be a NLHE reentry tournament, sporting a $1.5 million guarantee. Several new formats have been added to the FTOPS schedule this time around, as players will get their first chance to play Five-Card-Omaha, Six-Card-Omaha, and Courchevel during an FTOPS.

Full Tilt Poker will also be bringing back their Player of the Series leader-board for the FTOPS XXIII, with the winner receiving a nice prize-package consisting of “the cool” custom avatar at Full Tilt Poker, as well as the more lucrative prize of an entry into every single FTOPS XIV tournament (with the exception of the two-day high-roller tournament) worth some $11,000.

Winners of individual events will receive a Gold Jersey Avatar, a custom Gold Jersey, as well as an exclusive FTOPS jacket, which will be awarded to every player at the final table.

Here is a look at the complete FTOPS XXIII schedule from the Full Tilt Poker website:

Date/Time

Game

Guarantee

 

Event #1
Sunday Aug 04
13:30 ET

$200 + $15
NL Hold’em
Re-Entry Tournament

$500,000

 

Event #2
Sunday Aug 04
16:30 ET

$300 + $20
NL Hold’em Turbo
Escalator

$100,000

 

Event #3
Monday Aug 05
11:00 ET

$100 + $9
PL Omaha Hi
Rebuy

$75,000

 

Event #4
Monday Aug 05
14:00 ET

$1,000 + $50
NL Hold’em
Re-Entry Tournament

$500,000

 

Event #5
Monday Aug 05
17:00 ET

$200 + $15
NL Hold’em Rush Turbo

$100,000

 

Event #6
Tuesday Aug 06
11:00 ET

$200 + $15
NL Omaha Hi/Lo 6-Max

$50,000

 

Event #7
Tuesday Aug 06
14:00 ET

$300 + $20
Razz

$50,000

 

Event #8
Tuesday Aug 06
17:00 ET

$100 + $9
NL Hold’em Turbo
Multi-Entry Tournament

$150,000

 

Event #9
Wednesday Aug 07
11:00 ET

$200 + $15
PL 5 Card Omaha Hi 6-Max

$50,000

 

Event #10
Wednesday Aug 07
14:00 ET

$300 + $20
NL Hold’em
Rebuy

$250,000

 

Event #11
Wednesday Aug 07
17:00 ET

$207 + $8
NL Hold’em Rush
Super Turbo

$100,000

 

Event #12
Thursday Aug 08
11:00 ET

$200 + $15
NL Irish

$75,000

 

Event #13
Thursday Aug 08
14:00 ET

$300 + $20
PL Courchevel Hi 6-Max

$50,000

 

Event #14
Friday Aug 09
11:00 ET

$100 + $9
NL Hold’em

$100,000

 

Event #15
Friday Aug 09
14:00 ET

$200 + $15
7-Stud

$25,000

 

Event #16
Saturday
Aug 10
11:00 ET

$500 + $30
NL Hold’em Heads Up

$100,000

 

Event #17
Saturday Aug 10
14:00 ET

$300 + $20
PL Omaha Hi 6-Max
Triple Chance

$100,000

 

Event #18
Saturday Aug 10
16:00 ET

$100 + $9
NL Hold’em Rush

$75,000

 

Event #19
Sunday Aug 11
10:30 ET

$120 + $9
NL Hold’em Knockout
Multi-Entry Tournament

$350,000

 

Event #20
Sunday Aug 11
13:30 ET

$300 + $20
NL Hold’em
Re-Entry Tournament

$750,000

 

Event #21
Sunday Aug 11
16:30 ET

$200 + $15
Hold’em Limit Turbo
Escalator

$30,000

 

Event #22
Monday Aug 12
11:00 ET

$300 + $20
PL Omaha Hi Heads Up

$50,000

 

Event #23
Monday Aug 12
14:00 ET

$1,000 + $50
NL Hold’em 6-Max
Double Chance

$300,000

 

Event #24
Monday Aug 12
17:00 ET

$200 + $15
NL Hold’em Turbo

$100,000

 

Event #25
Tuesday Aug 13
11:00 ET

$240 + $15
PL Omaha Hi/Lo
Knockout

$75,000

 

Event #26
Tuesday Aug 13
14:00 ET

$300 + $20
2-7 Triple Draw Limit 6-Max

$30,000

 

Event #27 (1r+1a)
Tuesday Aug 13
17:00 ET

$100 + $9
NL Hold’em Turbo
1 Rebuy + 1 Add-On

$100,000

 

Event #28
Wednesday Aug 14
11:00 ET

$200 + $15
PL 6 Card Omaha Hi 6-Max

$50,000

 

Event #29
Wednesday Aug 14
14:00 ET

$100 + $9
NL Hold’em 6-Max
Rebuy

$150,000

 

Event #30
Wednesday Aug 14
17:00 ET

$310 + $10
NL Hold’em Super Turbo
Knockout
Re-Entry Tournament

$150,000

 

Event #31
Thursday Aug 15
11:00 ET

$500 + $30
10-Game 6-Max
Multi-Entry Tournament

$75,000

 

Event #32
Thursday Aug 15
14:00 ET

$200 + $15
PL Omaha Hi Rush

$50,000

 

Event #33
Friday Aug 16
11:00 ET

$200 + $15
NL Hold’em 6-Max

$100,000

 

Event #34
Friday Aug 16
14:00 ET

$200 + $15
7-Stud Hi/Lo

$25,000

 

Event #35 (2-Day)
Saturday Aug 17
11:00 ET

$2,000 + $100
NL Hold’em
Ante From Start RET (3x)
Two-Day Event

$1,000,000

 

Event #36
Saturday Aug 17
14:00 ET

$200 + $15
Omaha Hi/Lo Limit

$30,000

 

Event #37
Saturday
Aug 17
16:00 ET

$100 + $9
NL Hold’em Rush
Rebuy

$200,000

 

Event #38
Sunday Aug 18
10:30 ET

$240 + $15
NL Hold’em 6-Max
Knockout
Re-Entry Tournament

$500,000

 

Main Event
Sunday
Aug 18
13:30 ET

$600 + $35
NL Hold’em
Re-Entry Tournament

$1,500,000

 

 Looking for tournament schedules for Titan Poker? Click this link.

The 5 Players Who Owned the 2013 WSOP: Matthew Ashton

At every World Series of Poker a few players indelibly leave their mark on the summer poker series, and this year was no exception. Out of all the competitors and the entire list of WSOP bracelet winners, the following five people were in my opinion the best of the best:

  • Dan Kelly
  • David “Bakes” Baker
  • Tom Schneider
  • Marco Johnson
  • Matthew Ashton

In this series I will give a little back-story to each of these players and detail their accomplishments during the 2013 WSOP, with Mathew Ashton being our final player on this list.

Matthew Ashton

UK poker pro Matthew Ashton is no stranger to World Series of Poker success (he came into the 2013 WSOP, his third, with four cashes including three Top 10 finishes), but few people even dream about having a WSOP like Ashton put together in 2013. Of all the players profiled Ashton has the least number of cashes, but the most final tables, with four each.

The highlight of Ashton’s 2013 WSOP was easily his win in the $50k Poker Players Championship where he became the first non-American to win the event, as well as the youngest to claim the Chip Reese Memorial Trophy. Ashton’s win also cemented him as one of the best young mixed game players in the world considering all of his WSOP cashes are in non-Holdem tournaments. Download your free software at Titan Poker Downloads.

Here is a look at the winners of the Poker Players Championship since the tournament’s inception in 2007:

  • 2007 Poker Players Championship winner: David “Chip” Reese
  • 2008 Poker Players Championship winner: Scotty Nguyen
  • 2009 Poker Players Championship winner: David Bach
  • 2010 Poker Players Championship winner: Mike Mizrachi
  • 2011 Poker Players Championship winner: Brian Rast
  • 2012 Poker Players Championship winner: Mike Mizrachi
  • 2013 Poker Players Championship winner: Matthew Ashton

The $1.7 million in prize-money shot his career live tournament earnings up to over $2.3 million, and with his three other final tables he took a solid lead in the 2013 World Series of Poker Player of the Year race.

During the 2013 WSOP Matthew earned over $2 million, captured his first WSOP bracelet, and is in a great position to win the 2013 WSOP POY award. Here is a look at his four cashes/final tables at the 2013 WSOP:

  • Event #55 $50,000 The Poker Players Championship: 1st place for $1,774,089
  • Event #23 $2,500 Seven Card Stud: 7th place for $18,266
  • Event #13 $5,000 Seven Card Stud Hi/Lo: 2nd place for $164,700
  • Event #5 $2,500 Omaha/Seven Card Stud Hi/Lo: 3rd place for $86,437

*Resources: www.wsop.com, www.thehendonmob.com

 

The 5 players Who Owned the 2013 WSOP: Marco Johnson

At every World Series of Poker a few players indelibly leave their mark on the summer poker series, and this year was no exception. Out of all the competitors and the entire list of WSOP bracelet winners, the following five people were in my opinion the best of the best:

  • Dan Kelly
  • David “Bakes” Baker
  • Tom Schneider
  • Marco Johnson
  • Matthew Ashton

In this series I will give a little back-story to each of these players and detail their accomplishments during the 2013 WSOP, and we’ll now be moving on to Marco Johnson.

Marco Johnson

Poker players may not recognize the name Marco Johnson, but they have likely heard of his online screen-name “CrazyMarco” which was instrumental in launching the investigation into the Super-User accounts at Absolute Poker. You see Marco Johnson was the man who lost to the infamous “PotRipper” account an Absolute Poker and received the enhanced hand histories from the site with the source code that was later deciphered by the poker community.

Johnson isn’t simply some footnote in online poker history though, Johnson is a very accomplished online poker player, and after his 2013 World Series of Poker you can also call him a very accomplished live tournament player as well. After an impressive 2013 WSOP Marco is currently in 6th place in the World Series of Poker Player of the Year race, and has even landed on the BLUFF Magazine Player of the Year leader-board, in 36th place.

Johnson picked up his first WSOP bracelet this year, after cashing seven times and making three final tables. Prior to his win he had finished runner-up on two separate occasions, but for Marco third time was definitely the charm. For his career he now has 24 WSOP cashes including seven final tables. Know more about Titan Poker, read this detailed review.

Johnson is a Jack-of-all-Trades in poker evidenced by his cashes at the 2013 WSOP, which all came in different poker variants:

  • Event #8 $2,500 Eight Game Mix: 8th place for $20,699
  • Event #13 $5,000 Seven Card Stud Hi/Lo: 13th place for $13,877
  • Event #22 $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha: 28th place for $7,050
  • Event #31 $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha Hi/Lo: 2nd place for $158,379
  • Event #44 $3,000 No Limit Hold'em: 22nd place for $17,910
  • Event #48 $2,500 Limit Hold'em - 6 Handed: 1st place for $206,796
  • Event #59 $2,500 2-7 Triple Draw Lowball: 16th place for $7,345

*Resources: www.wsop.com, www.thehendonmob.com

Page 4 of 93« First...23456...Last »

Most Commented News Posts